Photo of the Week: Taking Over the Family Business

July 01, 2014

TechnoServe is helping a Guatemalan restaurant and food processing business usher in a new era of growth.

With its rustic decor and the smell of handmade sausages, Restaurante Katok in Tecpán, Guatemala, lives up to its name — katok means “come in” in the local indigenous language. General manager Fara Sánchez greets restaurant patrons with a warm smile that belies a busy schedule overseeing 80 employees and running two side operations — an artisan condiment business and a small-scale slaughterhouse. The 28-year-old took over managing duties last year from her father, Victor (pictured right), who ran the family business for 30 years.

“TechnoServe has helped us to transition between generations,” Fara says. In 2013, Katok was one of 62 Guatemalan businesses to receive mentoring and support through TechnoServe’s Impulsa Tu Empresa program. Fara learned better financial management and worked with a business advisor to improve operations and identify new regional markets for Katok’s meat products and sauces. “Overall, it has been a valuable experience and has helped us to increase our sales,” she says.

Learn more about how Impulsa Tu Empresa is helping small and growing businesses in four countries boost their growth.

 

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