Photo of the Week: Guatemalan Juice Business Bears Fruit

January 10, 2014

TechnoServe helped Mónica Jacinto and the other women behind Kask’i increase their sales and create a better future for their families.

Mónica Jacinto once struggled to support herself and her four children. After her husband left, she sometimes went without food so that her children could eat. Determined to become financially independent, she joined an association of women from Guatemala’s San Lucas Tolimán region. Together they started producing fruit juices using a simple blender and formed the business Kask’i.

TechnoServe helped the women of Kask’i improve their business and marketing skills, acquire better equipment and reach new markets. After working with TechnoServe, the business increased its production and began selling their product for a better price. The added income has helped Mónica provide her children with better food, clothes and an education without borrowing money or sacrificing her own well-being.

Learn more about our work with Kask’i.

 

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